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Waldo

oil for a shiny coat?

Hi All,
Annie's coat (and she is quite a hairy thing) seems a bit dry in comparison to others (not that we see that many as a rule) in the breed, at a recent club event another owner commented that flax seed oil on their food every day does wonders for the coat. My wife tried to get some at the local supermarket but had no success, does anyone else do something similar?
Cheers,
Waldo
guy

I give mine Kronch Salmon Oil
http://www.henne-pet-food.dk/engl/lakseolie.htm  i usually buy it on EBay.

Failing that - try tinned sardines in oilou will notice a difference in 10 days or so.

Whole uncooked fresh egg seems to help as well.
Waldo

Thanks Guy,
The salmon oil looks great, if it does half it say's it does it should have Annie looking/going like a treat. Good for coat, skin, allergies, rhuematism, that pretty well covers her conditions, nothing ventured nothing gained.
Cheers,
Waldo
Victoria

Waldo, I give mine along with the sardine oil, Nature's Own odourless Fish Oil available here from pharmacies and health shops.   It was on special for $39.99 (for 200 capsules) which seemed a good price at the time...the effect on the fur is obvious overnight...the salmon oil as recommended by Guy is said to the best but here it is difficult to find.   Sometimes I give mine olive oil soaked in toast and fed with a little milk and water...they seem to like that too!
Des O'Neile

Any sort of oil, rapeseed, flax, cod liver, the Kronch oil is very good or a small square of margerine but for nearly ant skin/coat ploblems feed tripe.
highclare

I always use mink oil on my dogs. Mink oil is an animal oil so is more natural to use on another animal. All dogs have some natural oil on them and if veg oil is put on the coat it will only give a short lived shine then it will pick up dust and dirt to make the dog dirty.
I always use mink oil on the Mabeleen but not on the day of a show as I don't want to give her a silky feel to her coat. I normaly put loads on her 2 days before I wash her then her coat looks shiney but the texture is correct.
Anyway what am I saying,,,, giving all my secrets away!!!!!!!!!!

Gill and the Mabeleen
doganjo

I think they mean internally, Gill - not actually spread on the coat.  Hmmm - a square of margarine?  Don't think I could do that to Allez - the girls would lick him to bits :-)
gundoglover

Waldo,
You can feed Livamol, which is available from the produce stores. They feed it to horses & cattle for shiny coats. It also helps retain the colour of the livers. You only need about a teaspoon a day or a tablespoon twice a week, so a bag lasts a very long time.

Here is a photo of my liver boy who has been on Livamol for the past 11 months. You can see how shiny his coat is. I noticed the improvement after about a month, when I first started using Livamol.



Click to see full size image
Waldo

Thanks GDl, I'll try and source the Livamol as I've had trouble getting the salmon oil locally.
Your liver/white dog looks real nice, our girl has just gradually become more liver less liver/white as she has gotten older (now 2 1/2), didn't really notice it till the other day the screen saver kicked in which shows fotos from the computer and I was amazed at how much more liver she is nkow.
Cheers,
WAldo
gundoglover

Waldo,
Yes, the Livamol is good and not hard to get in the country. Thankyou for your kind words about my boy. He has matured nicely, I think. Now that he has his show championship, I have started him on obedience. I don't know if I'll have time for non-slip retrieving trials. He shows good potential, but it is hard for me to find the time while I am still working full time. I was wondering how you & Annie went at the beginner's test. Did you both have a fun time? Do you think that you'll keep it up?
Des O'Neile

Until this thread I had never even heard of anybody rubbing oil on their dog. I was giving oil etc. for incorporation in feed.

It may of course just be the resolution on my notebook but if that is supposed to be a photo of a dog with a glossy coat I would hate to see a dry coat.
Waldo

Hi GDL,
No, I don't think I'll be taking up retrieving trials in a hurry. I did a bit of a report under "training", check it out if you get a chance. Realistically most of our hunting is deer and if she continues to improve as she has, she will be a top deer hunting companion. Would love to train her more "conventionally" to see more of her potential but time is short (and my skill levels aren't probably to that level at this stage).
Cheers,
Waldo
Ghilliegumdrop

When I had, and was showing, my Standard Poodle we used Mink Oil spray for the coat as a conditioner, it kept the coat in lovely condition. You needed to be careful how much you used though as it was quite greasy.
Waldo

Well after trying a few places locally for Salmon oil and not being able to find any, I gave some cheap vegetable oil we had in the pantry a try and after a couple of days there is some improvement in Annie's coat already. I've been giving her a soup spoon each night in her food and it seems to be working a treat, I'll keep it up for a week or two and see how it goes.
Cheers,
Waldo
guy

don't they give horses Linseed oil for glossy coats and hooves.?
gundoglover

Waldo.
Glad that you are getting some improvement. The harsh, hot, dry Australian climate is very hard on our dogs' coats, particularly those that are not kept indoors all day.
Victoria

Yes, linseed is fed to horses and dairy goats...not only good for coats...but it (the seeds) is usually soaked and fed "wet" in with their hard feed...must be fed in moderation only...I fed my heavy milkers a tablespoon only a day...


This is what Juliette de Bairacli Levy says in her book 'The Complete Herbal  Handbook for the Dog and Cat' about Linseed for dogs...

...this is a valuable winter tonic when fed in small quantities along with the cereal foods.  Linseed is rich in minerals, and its valuable oil is very fattening and is a wonderful hair and nerve tonic when used internally...or externaly as a hair stimulant and general massage aid.Linseed must be prepared carefully, for otherwise, owing to its very tough outer coaat, it remains entirely inedible and contains a harmful acid.  The seed should be soaked in much water for twenty-four hours.  Discard the water. Next day cook slowing for about thirty minutes, stirring repeatedly in order to prevent it burning.   The fluid obtained during the cooking should not be thrown out, for it possesses valuable mineral salts and some oil.  It should be used as a base for other soup, reboiling it along with vegetable wastes, leaves, onion and potato skins etc...Do not add meat...linseed can also be prepared soaked, raw, in the same way as bean sprouts...

she also  lists

linseed tea as a food to increase the bitches milk

a strong infusion of linseed tea can be beneficial when applied to inflammed anal glands


Waldo, before I managed to find the fish oil, I would pour a dessertspoon of olive or sunflower oil over their food, every few days, not everyday!.
Ghilliegumdrop

Be careful giving oil when the weather is very hot.............
And when I remember why you should be careful I will let you know Twisted Evil
doganjo

Waldo wrote:
Well after trying a few places locally for Salmon oil and not being able to find any, I gave some cheap vegetable oil we had in the pantry a try and after a couple of days there is some improvement in Annie's coat already. I've been giving her a soup spoon each night in her food and it seems to be working a treat, I'll keep it up for a week or two and see how it goes.
Cheers,
Waldo

That's what i use - veg oil.  Same amount, all my dogs get it.  Good for the old lady's joints too.
guy

there was a programme on radio 4 the other week about omega 3, 6 and 9 and the various health claims made by manufacturers.  i am not sure how the dog's metabolism compares with ours - but we don't need 9 at all and 6  is harmful, 3 is the one we need - AND the only good source of 3 is marine.

That is a simplification of the programme which you can hear here http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00ncwwm

If you cannot get salmon oil how about codliver oil? for example
http://www.healthy-oil-planet.com/cod-liver-oil-for-dogs.html

Cod liver oil is available in UK at health food shops in bottles and capsules.
doganjo

These scientific things are all good, but my dogs have always been given veg oil, none have suffered and all have glossier coats than when I started and my old GWP still hunts like a mad thing at 12 and half.  perhaps my dogs are the exception to the rule. Laughing  Laughing
steve

hi annie how much and how often please many thanks

steve
doganjo

I give mine a full teaspoonful of veg oil every morning.  Occasionally sunflower instead and sometimes they get a treat of a tin of sardines
steve

many thanks annie
guy

all the quality complete dog foods give an analysis of the oil content in the recipe and this has been carefully balanced with the proteins to suit the dog and work load the feed is directed to.  Perhaps we should consider what we are feeding rather than adding extra oil??  

However I know I supplement mine and I justify this on the grounds that the freshly added oil will not be oxidised and as it is fish oil is high in beneficial Omega3 which from research is beneficial to human brain activity and by extrapolation (by me and maybe erroneous) to my dogs.   Also because i now feed working dog 'maintenance'  so the oil and the sardines or the fresh cooked liver they sometimes get are a 'perk' to this diet and finally it gives a variation to the aroma and appeal of the kibble

There is a 'feedback' mechanism with fish oil as well - if they are getting too much I can smell it on their breath the next day.
Lin Dyke

Found this...thought it might be useful.....

 https://www.petplanet.co.uk/vet_answers.asp?thread_id=673
doganjo

Quote:
feed working dog 'maintenance'


Mine too. And whatever "balanced diet" they are on, and I have tried a fair few of them in the 27 years I've had this breed,  mine never have a shiny coat unless I add the oil.  Except if I feed Challenge Salmon and Potato - but with five mouths to fill it is a bit on the expensive side, so I think I'll stick with the present combination for the moment.  I don't like switching them about too much anyway.
Patricia

I don't think a decent diet needs supplementing ! For coat and improvement on growth of hair plus shine, try Proplan Salmon & Rice. Baileys had a Ceasar and was shaved right off on her tummy. It did not take 5 months to get all her hair back plus more...
You can also give too much oil. As a dog  groomer I have a customer's 5 little dogs, from terriers to Lhassas. They were fed on a top brand- probably  one of the most expensive- which contains a large amount of oil. Result: the coats are greasy and horrible from the Norwich to the Lhassa.
Unfortunately the best diets are expensive, the ingredients being fresh meat and rice and not beaks, feet and feathers ground up Confused
A good diet should not need to be added to, or maybe  it is because of our own thoughts  that their diet is " boring"!!!
barbara

All mine are fed on Purina Pro Plan without supplements, six on salmon & rice and four on 'light'.  You can overdose on too much oil and supplements. Shocked

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